Do Scars Spread?

Do Scars Spread?

The answer is yes and no. Typical scars, like acne scars, surgery scars or c-section scars do not spread. Of course, if you gain weight, then it is merely the skin stretching rather than the scar actually spreading.

However, there is one type of scar that will spread beyond the bounds of the wound, and that is a keloid scar.

Keloid Scars

In the simplest of terms, keloid scars are scars that become enlarged because your body is producing too much collagen—and therefore, too much tissue—at the site of the wound. Typically, keloid scars become raised in a dome-shaped fashion and begin to expand beyond the original location of the wound. Keloid scars are usually pink, shiny, and tender to the touch.

Read: Do Genes Determine Keloid Scars?

Needless to say, developing keloid scars can be bizarre and frightening for those who have never experienced keloids before. The good news is that keloid scars are no more dangerous than other types of scar tissue. Some patients complain about them being more painful, but usually, they are just itchier as they heal. The bad news is that they are often more unsightly than other scars, leading patients to seek surgical methods or other solutions to try to shrink them or have them removed.

Read: Who is at Risk for Developing Keloid Scars?

The Difference Between Scar Types

Though many people aren’t familiar with the lingo, there are several different types of scars out there. The first and most common type, of course, is a simple flat scar. If you cut your skin, you will normally heal quickly, with nothing but a pale white line on your skin to mark the spot where you had your wound. These scars can’t spread at all and don’t even become raised above the skin. In other words, they are the least invasive of all scars.

The second type of scar is called a hypertrophic scar. The word hypertrophic means “enlarged” or “excessive growth,” but unlike keloid scars, hypertrophic scars don’t spread beyond the wound. Instead, these scars may thicken and appear to be raised above the skin. Hypertrophic scars are typically redder and more visually obvious than flat scars.

There are other types of scars—including contracture scars, which actually tighten your skin, usually after a burn, and pitted scars, which can result from picking or itching at acne or chicken pox. Of all of the types of scars, keloid scars are unique in their ability to spread beyond the area of the original wound.

Have a question about your scar? Post a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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The information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. Please speak to your doctor to treat any medical condition. Information on this site is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-physician relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.
Does Tweezing Cause Dark Spots?

Does Tweezing Cause Dark Spots?

Have you ever plucked your eyebrows or tweezed away other bits of facial hair, only to find later that the process had left behind dark spots on your skin?

You’re not alone. While many people can pluck, tweeze, and wax away hairs without having to deal with these unsightly consequences, others consistently notice brown spots after tweezing.

The Causes of Dark Spots

Yes, tweezing can and often does cause hyperpigmentation. However, now that we have answered the question, it’s important for us to look at why plucking hairs can cause dark spots. Furthermore, it’s also essential that we look at other potential causes for dark spots—particularly on the face—so that you don’t immediately blame tweezing for the problem.

There are a number of factors that can leave behind dark spots on your skin. One common cause is acne, particularly if you are someone who tends to pick at pimples and zits. Sometimes, the dark spots on your skin can have a root cause called folliculitis, or ingrown hairs. It’s not uncommon for facial hair or body hair follicles to become ingrown, which can lead to both irritating red acne bumps and unsightly dark spots. Other times, the spots on your skin might just be freckles.

There is also a harmless but frustrating skin condition called hyperpigmentation. With hyperpigmentation, deposits of excess melanin can form beneath your skin, causing patches of your skin to be darker than others.

Why Tweezing Can Cause Dark Spots to Form

The explanation for why plucking hairs can lead to dark spots is actually a mixture of the causes listed above. In some cases, tweezing your hairs can cause a hair follicle to become ingrown, which in turn causes acne and dark skin spots.

In other cases, tweezing a hair can cause problems with hyperpigmentation. When you pluck a hair with tweezers, you are essentially ripping the hair right out of the follicle. This action is good because the hair won’t grow back as quickly as it would if you simply trimmed or shaved it. However, tweezing a hair can also cause damage at the root of the hair follicle. This damage can in turn lead to the overproduction of melanin, which can cause a darkening of the skin at the location of the tweezing.

How to Avoid Dark Spots from Tweezing

So how can you avoid getting dark spots from tweezing your hairs? The best preventative method is to be clean and smart as you are tweezing. Wash your face to get oils and bacteria off your face and dab the spot you are going to pluck with a hot washcloth. These steps will clean your skin and open your pores, making it easier to extract the hairs.

When you do go to tweeze the hairs, make sure you are doing so in the direction the hair grows. Plucking in an opposite direction will always cause more pain and irritation while also leading to ingrown hairs.

Fade Dark Spots with InviCible

If you have dark spots from tweezing that you can’t seem to shake, InviCible might be able to help. Learn more about our advanced treatment product to fade scars and dark spots.

Do you have a question about your dark spots or scars? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to assist.

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What is Scar Desensitization Therapy?

What is Scar Desensitization Therapy?

Often, following surgery or an injury that leaves behind a major wound, the first thing that patients are worried about is how the scar will look when the wound has healed.

While the visibility of scars is a concern, though, it is equally important to think about the overall maneuverability of the area in which the scar tissue is forming. Scar tissue is, by definition, tougher and less pliable than normal skin. Read: Why Scar Tissue is Different from Normal Tissue.

For hands and joints especially, this lack of pliability is a problem, as it can significantly impair the range of motion that you are capable of achieving. Playing instruments is difficult with scarred hands, for instance, just because the scar tissue makes dexterous and accurate movement more difficult.

Scar Desensitization

Luckily, there are types of therapy that can, as a scar heals, help to ensure that it is as pliable and maneuverable as possible in the future. Scar desensitization therapy, for instance, is at least partially designed with this aim in mind. The basic idea behind scar desensitization is that, as a wound continues to heal and scar tissue forms and matures, that tissue becomes tighter, tougher, and less pliable. If allowed to heal without scar desensitization therapy, a scar will have a considerably more adverse impact on range of motion than it would have with therapy.

Scar massage and other similar procedures are the core basis of scar desensitization therapy. By rubbing and tapping on a scar region as it heals and as scar tissue continues to form, you can ensure that scar tissue is growing uniformly across the wound. More systematic growth, in turn, can reduce the feeling of tightness that often comes with a fully healed scar, allowing for a broader range of motion in that part of the body.

Dealing with Hypersensitivity

Scar desensitization also helps to reduce skin hypersensitivity in and around a scar. The site of an injury or surgical incision on the skin can often feel irritated, itchy, or sore for weeks or months after the spot has started healing. The soreness can radiate out from the site of the wound as well, affecting surrounding skin. The nerve fibers of the skin in these spots have been interrupted by the injury, which results in skin that is hypersensitive and often racked with discomfort.

Massaging or tapping the scar as it heals desensitizes these nerve fibers and helps to restore a feeling of normalness to your scar area. In the short term, this therapeutic action contributes to reducing pain and irritation. In the long run, it helps restore capability to the scarred area faster and more fully than would otherwise be possible.

Treating Scars Further

Scar desensitization therapy is smart because it minimizes the ongoing chronic pain of an injury and maximizes the range of motion. These factors are both highly relevant to your continued quality of life, and should be the first thing you address when you begin treating a scar. Afterward, once the scar tissue has formed and the hypersensitive nerve fibers have desensitized, you can start thinking about how to treat the scar to reduce its overall visibility. InviCible Scars can help with that part of the therapeutic process, with our powerful scar treatment cream.

Do you have a question about your scar? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to assist.

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What is Therapeutic Ultrasound for Scars?

What is Therapeutic Ultrasound for Scars?

Most people equate the word “ultrasound” with fetal imaging. Indeed, one of the most common applications of ultrasound technology is allowing a pregnant woman to see her unborn child, know its gender ahead of time, or learn other things about a pregnancy.

However, while ultrasound technology is probably most often used for fetal imaging, it can serve several other valuable applications as well—including, believe it or not, scar therapy.

A “therapeutic ultrasound” is a type of ultrasound that utilizes ultra-high sonic frequencies as an aid in the healing of wounds or other injuries. When an ultrasound probe covered in a gel is touched to a wounded area, the probe transfers high-frequency vibration into the tissues at that site. These vibrations can relax the local tissues and direct extra blood flow into the area, which can in turn help to relieve pain and speed up healing.

Why Therapeutic Ultrasounds Are Good for Scars

It is important to note that therapeutic ultrasound technology can have positive effects on many different kinds of injuries. Chronic back pain, muscle sprains or strains, pain in the tailbone, joint issues (including certain types of arthritis), and more. With injured or arthritic joints, the increased blood flow provided by a therapeutic ultrasound can actually assist in collagen reformation. The positive effects of therapeutic ultrasound, in other words, are versatile and far-reaching.

In scar therapy, a therapeutic ultrasound might be used for the purpose of scar tissue breakdown. Previously injured tissue can lose its elasticity as scar tissue grows back in its place—a phenomenon that isn’t only limited to skin, but which also occurs in muscles, tendons, and other body tissues. This more hardened tissue can be a significant problem depending on the location of the scar on the body. Since scar tissue is less elastic than the intact skin, it can impair range of motion and overall function in parts of the body that tend to move or flex on a regular basis. Scars on the hands, at joints, or on the face are examples.

Therapeutic ultrasound can help “break down” the fibrous, collagen-rich tissue that forms at the site of scars. The fast vibrations of the ultrasound probe can contribute to making scar tissue more elastic, which in turn can restore range of motion and reduce scar pain or irritation.

Similarity to Scar Desensitization

The effects of this type of therapy, then, are similar to the benefits of scar desensitization—which involves rubbing or tapping scars as they heal to eliminate sensory nerve fibers and ensure more evenly distributed and pliable scar tissue. The main difference in these two forms of scar therapy is that one (scar desensitization) is only efficient during the scar healing process while the other (therapeutic ultrasound) can be effective both during healing and after scar tissue has formed and hardened.

Do you have a question for us? Leave a comment and let us know!

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Can You Get Rid of an Indented Scar?

Can You Get Rid of an Indented Scar?

Although scarring is a natural and necessary phase of healing, this process sometimes leaves indentations, puckering, or pockmarking where the tissue below the skin has been damaged or lost. These are called atrophic scars, most commonly caused by acne, injury, and surgery. Although some level of scarring may be permanent, there are safe topical treatments available to help restore this underlying tissue and smooth the surface of the skin to reduce the appearance of scars. These treatments include a blend of vitamins and nutrients that have demonstrated a significant clinical benefit to skin healing and scar reduction.

Scars and Skin Form Differently

Scar tissue is built from the same collagen protein as normal skin, but the fibers are arranged differently. Where natural skin is a somewhat randomly assorted matrix, which allows sweat glands and hair follicles to form, scar tissue fibers are arranged in strong, though less flexible, parallel layers that do not allow for sweat glands or hair follicles.

When skin is damaged by injury, surgery, or acne, the skin layers are forcibly separated. Once the interference is removed or resolved, the skin immediately begins to generate new cells, adding fibers of collagen in roughly diagonal rows. Many factors affect the speed of this process, as well as what kind of scar eventually forms.

Minimizing Scars as they Heal

While the scar is forming, the layers of skin that come together may not align properly if the wound moves too much, or the skin becomes too dry or too damp. Therefore, during the healing process, it is important to both immobilize the area to maintain proper alignment, and to ensure that the skin along the edges does not dry out or become too moist.

Using a properly formulated scar treatment, such as InviCible Scars, as directed during the healing process helps to maintain proper elasticity while also feeding the skin vitamins and nutrients that are essential for healing.

InviCible Advanced Scar Therapy includes vitamin C, licorice, and aloe vera to completely heal the area, and restore elasticity and skin tone, as well as silicone and essential fatty acids to reduce skin pocking and indentation.

For years, vitamin E was used topically as well, but this has recently been discouraged by dermatology experts as it can cause skin irritation. Other ingredients to avoid include hydroquinone, Kojic acid, and anything with fragrance or preservatives.

Reducing Scars after Healing

Skin and scar tissue continually regenerates and replaces cell layers throughout our lives. Though this process is more gradual than the initial healing, it does mean that the appearance of scars can be altered even after they have fully formed. If given the proper tools, the body will continue to heal and repair old scars.

InviCible Advanced Scar Therapy comes highly recommended by doctors who treat skin disease, such as acne, or perform surgery. Regular application of our nutrient-rich product helps to drive the healing process and reduces the appearance of scars and uneven skin tone.

Do you have a question about your scar? Leave a comment and let us know!

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