Do Scars Spread?

Do Scars Spread?

The answer is yes and no. Typical scars, like acne scars, surgery scars or c-section scars do not spread. Of course, if you gain weight, then it is merely the skin stretching rather than the scar actually spreading.

However, there is one type of scar that will spread beyond the bounds of the wound, and that is a keloid scar.

Keloid Scars

In the simplest of terms, keloid scars are scars that become enlarged because your body is producing too much collagen—and therefore, too much tissue—at the site of the wound. Typically, keloid scars become raised in a dome-shaped fashion and begin to expand beyond the original location of the wound. Keloid scars are usually pink, shiny, and tender to the touch.

Read: Do Genes Determine Keloid Scars?

Needless to say, developing keloid scars can be bizarre and frightening for those who have never experienced keloids before. The good news is that keloid scars are no more dangerous than other types of scar tissue. Some patients complain about them being more painful, but usually, they are just itchier as they heal. The bad news is that they are often more unsightly than other scars, leading patients to seek surgical methods or other solutions to try to shrink them or have them removed.

Read: Who is at Risk for Developing Keloid Scars?

The Difference Between Scar Types

Though many people aren’t familiar with the lingo, there are several different types of scars out there. The first and most common type, of course, is a simple flat scar. If you cut your skin, you will normally heal quickly, with nothing but a pale white line on your skin to mark the spot where you had your wound. These scars can’t spread at all and don’t even become raised above the skin. In other words, they are the least invasive of all scars.

The second type of scar is called a hypertrophic scar. The word hypertrophic means “enlarged” or “excessive growth,” but unlike keloid scars, hypertrophic scars don’t spread beyond the wound. Instead, these scars may thicken and appear to be raised above the skin. Hypertrophic scars are typically redder and more visually obvious than flat scars.

There are other types of scars—including contracture scars, which actually tighten your skin, usually after a burn, and pitted scars, which can result from picking or itching at acne or chicken pox. Of all of the types of scars, keloid scars are unique in their ability to spread beyond the area of the original wound.

Have a question about your scar? Post a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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Which is Better for Scars: Silicone Creams or Silicone Sheets?

Which is Better for Scars: Silicone Creams or Silicone Sheets?

There are endless treatments for scars – lotions and gels, ointments and injections. They’re stuffed into pharmacy aisles and online inventories alike, promising fast results and easy healing. However, two of these treatments manage to keep those promises.

Silicone creams and silicone sheets counter the effects of scarring. They both relieve inflammation while also decreasing rigidity and improving elasticity. They also both deliver concentrated polymers to the skin, improving its appearance, texture, and collagen responses. This makes them ideal for treatment – but which is best?

What is Silicone’s Effect on Scars?

Silicone proves essential in the healing process. It infuses the skin with key amines (organic nitrogen-based compounds) to maintain proper hydration and oxygenation levels. It also interrupts the body’s excessive collagen composition, stabilizing levels to reduce the build-up of tissue. This ensures that scars heal quickly and minimizes their overall appearance.

Read More: Scar Healing

What is Silicone Cream?

Silicone cream, as its name suggests, is a spreadable topical formulation fortified with silicone. It allows for direct skin contact, with individuals applying it to their scar sites. This introduces amines into the body and expedites healing.

Read More: Silicone Creams

What is a Silicone Sheet?

A silicone sheet is an adhesive product. It’s a two-sided design similar to a bandage that combines a latex shell with silicone gel padding. This padding rests against the scar and delivers steady nutrients throughout the day. It’s typically reusable.

Read More: Silicone Sheets

Which is Best: Silicone Creams or Silicone Sheets

The effectiveness of silicone creams and sheets are undeniable. Both products, according to studies conducted by Dr. Thomas A. Mustoe, a member of the Feinberg School of Medicine, promote accelerated healing within the body and reduce the effects of scarring. They’re useful against keloids, hypertrophic scars, contractures, and more. However, one does offer distinct advantages over the other.

Silicone creams are more efficient for daily use. Their lightweight formulas absorb directly into the skin, rather than requiring adhesives (which can roll, twist, or come undone.) Cream is easily used with other topical options such as sun block, make-up, moisturizers, or cleansers, and they’re undetectable. It’s also easily applied to facial areas, where sheets often prove cumbersome. These benefits make them ideal for the treatment of new and old scars alike.

Read More: New and Old Scars

Consult With a Physician

Silicone creams offer the same advantages as silicone sheets, but are much easier to use. Some individuals, however, may require more extensive procedures to treat their scars – such as dermabrasion, micro-needling, chemical peels, facial revisions, and more. Be sure to consult with a physician if you have a very complex scar.

Read More: Scar Treatments

Silicone scar products are the gold standard in scar therapy. This makes them perfect for treating inflammation, rigidity, and more.

Have a question about silicone creams, sheets, or other options? Leave us a comment! We’ll be happy to provide more information. Subscribe to Scars and Spots to get our posts delivered to your inbox.

Scars Heal Differently. Here’s Why

Scars Heal Differently. Here’s Why

After the skin becomes injured, scar tissue forms as a part of the natural healing process. This tissue looks and feels different than normal skin tissue because there is excess collagen produced. Different scars also appear different and heal differently based upon the amount of collagen produced during the healing process. Lifestyle, genetics, age, depth and size of the injury, the location, and the treatment of the wound all affect how the scar heals.

Read: Scar Tissue is Different Than Normal Tissue 

Genetic and Lifestyle Influences on Scar Healing

As with any body function, your genetics, which include your ethnicity and gender, influence how your body heals from injury, which is why each person scars differently. These genetic influences cannot be changed, but they can be mitigated through lifestyle changes and certain treatments. Your age will affect scarring as well, because your ability to regenerate cells and heal is reduced.

Lifestyle factors, including exercising, drinking plenty of water, and eating a healthy diet, influence your skin’s natural healing process as well. To heal properly, you need to be strong and healthy. Your skin also needs certain nutrients that it can get from food, especially vitamin C and E. You skin also needs plenty of moisture to heal correctly, which is why keeping your scar moisturized is vital. You should also keep active, as long as it does not disturb your wound and your doctor approves it, to promote healing.

The Affect of Wound Treatment

Because scars are caused by injury to the skin, the element that has the greatest influence on its healing process is the treatment of the wound. When you experience a deep cut, including an incision from surgery, the skin needs to be aligned correctly when it is glued, stapled, or stitched back together, or else it will have a larger scar. Your scar will look different whether you have staples, glue, or stitches as well. If the injured skin is brought back together perfectly, then the chance of scarring is reduced, although you may still have a small, almost invisible line. You also want to allow the area to heal completely, and not reopen the wound or get it infected, as this will increase the chance of a larger scar.

How the Type of Scar Alters the Healing Process

There are different types of scars that affect the ability for the scar to heal over time. You may have a hypertrophic scar, acne scar, contracture scar, or keloid scars. Keloid scars are the most difficult to heal, because they are raised scars due to excess collagen that extend beyond the original injury. Contracture scars typically occur after a burn, and they often tighten the skin and can make it difficult to move. Hypertrophoic scars are also raised, similar to keloids, but remain within the area of the wound. Some of these different types of scars occur because of the type of wound, while others form due to genetics, the environment, or other factors.

Read: Scar Healing Time

There is no real way to predict how a scar will heal, as it is highly influenced by genetics, environment, lifestyle factors, and treatment. Regardless of the type of scar, you can help it heal by taking care of the wound, eating a healthy diet, and drinking plenty of water.

Do you have a question about your scar? Leave us a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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Do Genes Determine Keloid Scars?

Do Genes Determine Keloid Scars?

Genetics play a significant role in the healing process of the body, which affects the formation of scars. Scientists have noted some factors that seem to suggest that genes play a role in the forming of keloid scars, including facts such as that people with darker skin are more at risk than people with fairer skin and that keloid scars seem to run in families. A study out of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit recently identified a gene that seems to play a significant role in the development of keloid scars.

What are Keloid Scars?

Keloid scars are those that are raised, dark, and larger than the original wound. They typically become itchy or painful, and may even continue to grow into a very large and unsightly scar. They can form in any area, although places where the skin stretches are more at risk of keloid scars. Scars formed due to piercings, especially in the ear lobe, are also at a higher risk. Because this type of scar tends to cause more problems than other types of scars, scientists have tried to understand why they form in order to find better ways to prevent and treat them.

Read: Where Do Keloid Scars Form?

The Genetic Link of Keloids

Doctors have tried to discover a reason for the formation of keloid scars, often looking for answers in genetics, especially as it is more common for keloids to form in families and certain skin tones. Previous studies have found that keloids more often form in dark skinned individuals, especially those of African heritage, while albinos have the lowest rates. It has long been recognized that certain cellular signals in change of controlling the growth become altered, which lead to keloid growth. Because genetics controls the cells, including these signals, a common hypothesis is that genes must play a role in the formation. This recent study sheds more light on the subject.

Read: Who is at Risk for Developing Keloid Scars?

Study Findings

Researchers from Henry Ford Hospital were able to demonstrate for the first time a relationship between an alteration of the AHNAK gene and keloid scars. The AHNAK gene has associations with cell-cell adhesion or exocytosis, which is involved in wound healing. The researchers reviewed normal tissue and keloid tissue for the expression of this gene, and found that three of the five keloid samples had a large reduction in the expression when compared to the normal samples, thus demonstrating a relationship. Although it remains in the early stages, it promises to provide better understanding about keloid scars, including how they form and the function of healing. This study was small, so subsequent research is necessary to provide further information.

Understanding the genetic link involved in the formation of keloid scars can help doctors learn better forms of treatment. Although researchers are still searching for more information, if you have a family history of keloids, then you have a greater risk of developing them yourself. There is a high chance that keloid scars are determined in some extent by your genes, but genetics are never the only factor involved. Lifestyle, environment, and other factors can also affect the healing process, leading to different types of scarring, including keloids.

Have a question about your scar? Post a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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InviCible Scars Review on Beyond Beauty Lounge

InviCible Scars Review on Beyond Beauty Lounge

Do you have a burn scar or keloid that you are looking to minimize the appearance of? Mercedes of Beyond Beauty Lounge recently burned her neck while testing out a curling wand. That is the type of accident you aren’t ever really prepared for.

As Mercedes asked in her InviCible Scars review, “Have you ever come across a product that you wish you had discovered sooner? That is exactly how I feel about the product I’m bringing you today, this is the type of product you want to have on hand even though you may not need it at the moment.”

Beyond Beauty Lounge InviCible Scars Review.

Mercedes also has a keloid scar from a bad ear piercing, which she also tried InviCible Scars on. She stated, “The keloid I have has decreased in size and color and is somewhat flatter.”

Be sure to check out her complete review on Beyond Beauty Lounge. Have you tried InviCible Scars yet to fade your scar?

Have a question about your scar? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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