Scar Cream Available Internationally on Amazon

Scar Cream Available Internationally on Amazon

The team here at InviCible Scars is happy to announce that you can now purchase our scar cream via Amazon US and have it shipped internationally.

Amazon US will now ship InviCible Scars to the following countries: [Read more…]

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Cosmetic Surgeon Red Flags You Should Not Ignore

Cosmetic Surgeon Red Flags You Should Not Ignore

As more and more cosmetic procedures become readily available and mainstream, it seems as if everyone is having something done. However, easy access to treatments and procedures comes with concerns.

As captured on the popular TV show “Botched,” things can go very wrong with serious, even life-threatening consequences. Anyone conducting cosmetic procedures can call themselves a cosmetic surgeon. However, to be considered a plastic surgeon one must be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Dr. Stanley Poulos, a Board-Certified San Francisco area Plastic Surgeon offers the following red flags not to ignore when selecting a plastic surgeon, dermatologist, aesthetician or anyone else you plan to trust your body with. [Read more…]

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What is Therapeutic Ultrasound for Scars?

What is Therapeutic Ultrasound for Scars?

Most people equate the word “ultrasound” with fetal imaging. Indeed, one of the most common applications of ultrasound technology is allowing a pregnant woman to see her unborn child, know its gender ahead of time, or learn other things about a pregnancy.

However, while ultrasound technology is probably most often used for fetal imaging, it can serve several other valuable applications as well—including, believe it or not, scar therapy.

A “therapeutic ultrasound” is a type of ultrasound that utilizes ultra-high sonic frequencies as an aid in the healing of wounds or other injuries. When an ultrasound probe covered in a gel is touched to a wounded area, the probe transfers high-frequency vibration into the tissues at that site. These vibrations can relax the local tissues and direct extra blood flow into the area, which can in turn help to relieve pain and speed up healing.

Why Therapeutic Ultrasounds Are Good for Scars

It is important to note that therapeutic ultrasound technology can have positive effects on many different kinds of injuries. Chronic back pain, muscle sprains or strains, pain in the tailbone, joint issues (including certain types of arthritis), and more. With injured or arthritic joints, the increased blood flow provided by a therapeutic ultrasound can actually assist in collagen reformation. The positive effects of therapeutic ultrasound, in other words, are versatile and far-reaching.

In scar therapy, a therapeutic ultrasound might be used for the purpose of scar tissue breakdown. Previously injured tissue can lose its elasticity as scar tissue grows back in its place—a phenomenon that isn’t only limited to skin, but which also occurs in muscles, tendons, and other body tissues. This more hardened tissue can be a significant problem depending on the location of the scar on the body. Since scar tissue is less elastic than the intact skin, it can impair range of motion and overall function in parts of the body that tend to move or flex on a regular basis. Scars on the hands, at joints, or on the face are examples.

Therapeutic ultrasound can help “break down” the fibrous, collagen-rich tissue that forms at the site of scars. The fast vibrations of the ultrasound probe can contribute to making scar tissue more elastic, which in turn can restore range of motion and reduce scar pain or irritation.

Similarity to Scar Desensitization

The effects of this type of therapy, then, are similar to the benefits of scar desensitization—which involves rubbing or tapping scars as they heal to eliminate sensory nerve fibers and ensure more evenly distributed and pliable scar tissue. The main difference in these two forms of scar therapy is that one (scar desensitization) is only efficient during the scar healing process while the other (therapeutic ultrasound) can be effective both during healing and after scar tissue has formed and hardened.

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Which is Better for Scars: Silicone Creams or Silicone Sheets?

Which is Better for Scars: Silicone Creams or Silicone Sheets?

There are endless treatments for scars – lotions and gels, ointments and injections. They’re stuffed into pharmacy aisles and online inventories alike, promising fast results and easy healing. However, two of these treatments manage to keep those promises.

Silicone creams and silicone sheets counter the effects of scarring. They both relieve inflammation while also decreasing rigidity and improving elasticity. They also both deliver concentrated polymers to the skin, improving its appearance, texture, and collagen responses. This makes them ideal for treatment – but which is best?

What is Silicone’s Effect on Scars?

Silicone proves essential in the healing process. It infuses the skin with key amines (organic nitrogen-based compounds) to maintain proper hydration and oxygenation levels. It also interrupts the body’s excessive collagen composition, stabilizing levels to reduce the build-up of tissue. This ensures that scars heal quickly and minimizes their overall appearance.

Read More: Scar Healing

What is Silicone Cream?

Silicone cream, as its name suggests, is a spreadable topical formulation fortified with silicone. It allows for direct skin contact, with individuals applying it to their scar sites. This introduces amines into the body and expedites healing.

Read More: Silicone Creams

What is a Silicone Sheet?

A silicone sheet is an adhesive product. It’s a two-sided design similar to a bandage that combines a latex shell with silicone gel padding. This padding rests against the scar and delivers steady nutrients throughout the day. It’s typically reusable.

Read More: Silicone Sheets

Which is Best: Silicone Creams or Silicone Sheets

The effectiveness of silicone creams and sheets are undeniable. Both products, according to studies conducted by Dr. Thomas A. Mustoe, a member of the Feinberg School of Medicine, promote accelerated healing within the body and reduce the effects of scarring. They’re useful against keloids, hypertrophic scars, contractures, and more. However, one does offer distinct advantages over the other.

Silicone creams are more efficient for daily use. Their lightweight formulas absorb directly into the skin, rather than requiring adhesives (which can roll, twist, or come undone.) Cream is easily used with other topical options such as sun block, make-up, moisturizers, or cleansers, and they’re undetectable. It’s also easily applied to facial areas, where sheets often prove cumbersome. These benefits make them ideal for the treatment of new and old scars alike.

Read More: New and Old Scars

Consult With a Physician

Silicone creams offer the same advantages as silicone sheets, but are much easier to use. Some individuals, however, may require more extensive procedures to treat their scars – such as dermabrasion, micro-needling, chemical peels, facial revisions, and more. Be sure to consult with a physician if you have a very complex scar.

Read More: Scar Treatments

Silicone scar products are the gold standard in scar therapy. This makes them perfect for treating inflammation, rigidity, and more.

Have a question about silicone creams, sheets, or other options? Leave us a comment! We’ll be happy to provide more information. Subscribe to Scars and Spots to get our posts delivered to your inbox.

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Wound Stapled, Stitched or Glued? Here’s the Type of Scar You Can Expect

Wound Stapled, Stitched or Glued? Here’s the Type of Scar You Can Expect

After surgery or a deep wound, your doctor will close the wound with sutures (stitches), glue, staples, or a combination of these. Securing the edges of the wound together is crucial for healing, but the type of skin closure can impact the appearance of the final scar. Depending on the way your doctor closed the wound, here’s the type of scar you can expect:

Staples

A staple incision closure is more consistent and faster than stitches. Surgical staples are disposable and are made of plastic or stainless steel. The problem with most skin staples is that they can leave permanent marks on the skin that create a “train track” look.

Sutures

Sutures are the most common way to close wounds, including incisions after surgery. The doctor basically sews the skin edges back together. Sutures can be permanent or absorbable. If permanent sutures are used to close the top skin layer, these need to be removed once the skin has healed. Absorbable sutures dissolve on their own over time once the tissues have healed and don’t need to be removed. Large sutures that are left in the skin for too long can lead to scars that look like stitching.

Glue

Smaller wounds that are not very deep may be put back together using special adhesive glue. This works similar to stitches and staples in that it secures the skin edges back together to promote the healing of the wound or incision. Skin glue does not leave “train track” or “stitch” marks.

Most Important Factors for the Best Scar

Whether you have staples, stitches, or just glue to help your wound heal, there are a few shared factors that promote the best looking scar. First and foremost, you want to be sure that the wound edges are lined up anatomically. Your doctor should ensure that the two layers of skin properly line up with one another. This helps the skin to heal more seamlessly, rather than looking jagged.
The depth and length of the injury, as well as the location, also affect the appearance of the scar. Certain lifestyle and genetic factors, including gender, race and age, also influence scarring. To promote healing and have the best looking scar, care for the wound correctly, eat healthily, drink plenty of water, and don’t smoke. Follow your doctor’s orders, which typically include keeping the area clean, covered, out of the sun, and moist to promote healing.

Once the wound has healed, ask your doctor if you are ready to start using a topical scar treatment to reduce the long-term appearance of your scar as much as possible.

Have a question about your scar? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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