How Do I Get Rid of Vaccination Scars?

How Do I Get Rid of Vaccination Scars?

As a result of the smallpox and tuberculosis vaccines, people often have scars where the vaccine was administered. Both vaccines are given by breaking the skin multiple times in a small area – typically on the upper arm—and the scab that results gives way to a small pitted or raised area. People who are vaccinated for smallpox or tuberculosis usually have one of three types of scarring: a low pitted area, a keloid, or a hypertrophic scar. Though treatment is similar for each reaction, there are some important differences.

If you have a pitted scar on your body, you will want to use a cream that contains Vitamin C, which will improve your skin’s elasticity and encourages growth of healthy collagen during scar healing. Products with aloe, licorice extract and essential fatty acids (EFAs) will even out skin tone and decrease any inflammation that you may have weeks after the vaccination.

Keloid scars are raised, thick scars that are often larger than the vaccination site itself. Keloids are caused by an overproduction of collagen in the skin, and they can continue to grow years after the vaccination. Though it is important to let the site heal, wrapping the area tightly with silicone sheeting can decrease the size keloid. Aloe, licorice extract and EFAs will also help to change the color of the scar closer to the color of your skin.

The final type of scar that could occur from smallpox or tuberculosis vaccines is the hypertrophic scar. Like keloids, hypertrophic scars are raised and caused by too much collagen growth, though hypertrophic scars are typically smaller and will not continue to grow after they have formed. Similar treatment is recommended, but you should consider focusing on ointments and gels with Vitamin C, aloe, and silicone. Silicone sheeting may be helpful; however, if your scar is small, the presence of silicone in a cream may be just as worthwhile.

Ultimately, you should not be ashamed of your vaccination scar, but you can use these easy treatments to improve the appearance of your scars. However, make sure that the skin around the vaccination site has healed before treating the scar to ensure that your skin is not infected after the vaccination.

Do you have a vaccination scar?

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Comments

  1. The information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. Please speak to your doctor to treat any medical condition. Information on this site is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-physician relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.
  2. Dominic B. Beard says:

    Can anyone at Invincible comment on product efficacy on stretch marks that have already seen some improvement (but not good enough) through treatment with Sciton HALO Fractional Laser treatment?

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