Can Waxing Cause Scarring?

Can Waxing Cause Scarring?

Waxing is one of the most common remedies to get rid of unwelcome hair, but with waxing comes a lot of questions. One of those questions is whether or not waxing can cause scarring.

While waxing shouldn’t cause scarring if done properly – that is, without breaking the skin or otherwise tearing out the hair follicles – waxing can leave behind noticeable brown spots, especially in sensitive areas of the body. Another problem some individuals may experience is burn marks left behind due to overheated wax, especially with home wax treatments.

That’s why it is important to pay special attention to these areas and to know how to wax properly so as to avoid this problem. The first thing to take note of is that you should never wax any area of the body to excess. Typically, it is recommended that you not wax any area of the body more than about every four weeks, though this can vary depending on the individual. Some people may wax a little bit more often, especially with tougher areas such as the legs.

However, it is still important to pay attention to your skin and what it is telling you. Never use wax over areas that are still recovering from previous waxing sessions or that are sensitive for any other reasons, or from any other treatments that you have used (such as tanning). If hair removal is necessary over these areas, it is recommended that you choose a hair removal method such as shaving that is more sensitive to the skin and the hair follicle, and that will allow the skin to continue to heal during this process.

How to Treat Brown Spots and Other Effects From Waxing

If your skin is sensitive because of waxing, or you have developed brown spots or any other lingering or lasting effects because of waxing, there are things that you can do to help heal the skin and to restore it. Using the right combination of ingredients to treat these effects is essential.

For example, Vitamin C is one such essential ingredient that can be used to treat brown spots easily and effectively, as it is an antioxidant that reverses cellular damage, especially to the cells that help to produce melanin. It also helps the skin to produce more collagen and overall helps to promote healing in the skin.

When choosing any products that promote healing in the skin, it is highly recommended that you avoid any products that contain the ingredients kojic acid and hydroquinone. These skin lightening agents are incredibly harmful to the skin, and will do far more harm than good to your body.

By paying attention to your skin’s needs, you can ensure that brown spots, redness, and damage to the skin because of overwaxing or even burns from overheated wax can be easily remedied. Choose the treatments that you use with caution and ensure that you use only the best products to promote the healing of your skin, especially in the most sensitive areas of your body.

Have a question about your scar? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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The information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. Please speak to your doctor to treat any medical condition. Information on this site is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-physician relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.
Does Tweezing Cause Dark Spots?

Does Tweezing Cause Dark Spots?

Have you ever plucked your eyebrows or tweezed away other bits of facial hair, only to find later that the process had left behind dark spots on your skin?

You’re not alone. While many people can pluck, tweeze, and wax away hairs without having to deal with these unsightly consequences, others consistently notice brown spots after tweezing.

The Causes of Dark Spots

Yes, tweezing can and often does cause hyperpigmentation. However, now that we have answered the question, it’s important for us to look at why plucking hairs can cause dark spots. Furthermore, it’s also essential that we look at other potential causes for dark spots—particularly on the face—so that you don’t immediately blame tweezing for the problem.

There are a number of factors that can leave behind dark spots on your skin. One common cause is acne, particularly if you are someone who tends to pick at pimples and zits. Sometimes, the dark spots on your skin can have a root cause called folliculitis, or ingrown hairs. It’s not uncommon for facial hair or body hair follicles to become ingrown, which can lead to both irritating red acne bumps and unsightly dark spots. Other times, the spots on your skin might just be freckles.

There is also a harmless but frustrating skin condition called hyperpigmentation. With hyperpigmentation, deposits of excess melanin can form beneath your skin, causing patches of your skin to be darker than others.

Why Tweezing Can Cause Dark Spots to Form

The explanation for why plucking hairs can lead to dark spots is actually a mixture of the causes listed above. In some cases, tweezing your hairs can cause a hair follicle to become ingrown, which in turn causes acne and dark skin spots.

In other cases, tweezing a hair can cause problems with hyperpigmentation. When you pluck a hair with tweezers, you are essentially ripping the hair right out of the follicle. This action is good because the hair won’t grow back as quickly as it would if you simply trimmed or shaved it. However, tweezing a hair can also cause damage at the root of the hair follicle. This damage can in turn lead to the overproduction of melanin, which can cause a darkening of the skin at the location of the tweezing.

How to Avoid Dark Spots from Tweezing

So how can you avoid getting dark spots from tweezing your hairs? The best preventative method is to be clean and smart as you are tweezing. Wash your face to get oils and bacteria off your face and dab the spot you are going to pluck with a hot washcloth. These steps will clean your skin and open your pores, making it easier to extract the hairs.

When you do go to tweeze the hairs, make sure you are doing so in the direction the hair grows. Plucking in an opposite direction will always cause more pain and irritation while also leading to ingrown hairs.

Fade Dark Spots with InviCible

If you have dark spots from tweezing that you can’t seem to shake, InviCible might be able to help. Learn more about our advanced treatment product to fade scars and dark spots.

Do you have a question about your dark spots or scars? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to assist.

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Is it Hyperpigmentation or Melanoma?

Is it Hyperpigmentation or Melanoma?

Noticing a brown or black spot on your skin that wasn’t there before can be scary. Sometimes, these spots are nothing more than hyperpigmentation, a common and harmless—but somewhat alarming—condition where small sections or patches of your skin take on a darker color than the rest of your skin. Hyperpigmentation is nothing more than concentrated deposits of melanin, which can collect randomly in one spot (or several spots) on your skin.

Unfortunately, the harmlessness of hyperpigmentation sometimes leads individuals who have the condition to ignore dark spots on their skin. If these spots are just concentrations of melanin, you really don’t have to pay much attention to them. However, one symptom of melanoma—the most severe and dangerous type of skin cancer—is brown or black spots or moles on the skin. Without careful attention to detail or medical consultation, it’s easy to mistake melanoma for simply hyperpigmentation (and vice versa).

The Differences Between Hyperpigmentation and Melanoma

Fortunately, there are subtle differences in moles or spots caused by hyperpigmentation and moles or spots. These differences fall into five different categories, which are easy to remember because they bear the initials of ABCDE. In assessing moles or dark spots, these initials refer to asymmetry, border, color, diameter, and elevation. Read on to discover more about the signs in each of these categories that can indicate melanoma rather than hyperpigmentation.

  • Asymmetry: Generally, hyperpigmentation patches (be they freckles, moles, or simple dark spots on your skin) are symmetrical in shape and size. A noticeably asymmetrical dark spot on your skin is worth consulting a doctor about, as it may be a sign of cancer.
  • Border: In addition to symmetry, dark spots caused by hyperpigmentation will have smooth edges that are easy to distinguish. Spots or moles with more jagged or irregular borders are more likely to be cancerous.
  • Color: In hyperpigmentation, melanin deposits can range from light to dark brown. Spots or moles that are black or rusty red in color appear more commonly in melanoma patients. With that said, melanoma spots can also be a more regular brown hue, so use color as a supplement to other identifying factors, instead of using it as your sole decider.
  • Diameter: Moles or dark spots with large diameters—or with diameters that seem to be expanding—are cause for alarm. Most dermatologists say that any skin spots bigger in diameter than a pencil eraser are worth having checked out by a medical professional.
  • Elevation: When it comes to assessing whether moles or spots are hyperpigmentation or melanoma, flatter is better. While some harmless moles are slightly raised, extremely elevated moles are often a sign of a more dangerous skin condition.

All of these factors can help you to determine, on your own, whether the dark spots on your skin are more likely to be the result of hyperpigmentation or melanoma. If you have a mole that is small, with a smooth border, symmetrical, flat, and light brown, chances are pretty good that you don’t have any reason for concern. When in doubt, though, consult your physician. It is invariably better to be safe than sorry when it comes to possible signs of skin cancer.

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What Causes Hyperpigmentation?

What Causes Hyperpigmentation?

A common skin disorder is hyperpigmentation, or a darkening of the skin pigment. Many different diseases, disorders, and actions can lead to hyperpigmentation. By knowing what is causing your dark spots or other skin pigment changes, then you can find the best way to return your skin to its normal color. It is possible to treat and repair the damage that causes hyperpigmentation.

What is Hyperpigmentation?

Hyperpigmentation is the darkening of melanin, the pigment in the skin cells. It can happen to just a small area, creating a freckle or spot, or it can cause problems on a large area of the body. Some people also have hyperpigmentation over their entire body. Typically, hyperpigmentation is not dangerous, making it solely a cosmetic concern. However, it could be symptomatic of another disorder that may be serious. Therefore, you should discuss any hyperpigmentation symptoms with your doctor to ensure there is not a serious condition underlying your skin disorder.

How Does it Develop?

One of the most common forms of hyperpigmentation is sun spots. These are the small to medium spots on your skin, typically the hands or face. They are caused by sun damage to the skin cells that creates an increase in melanin production in just one area of the body. Another common reason for this skin problem is melasma, which is a specific type of hyperpigmentation that arises during pregnancy due to the hormonal changes. Other disorders that affect your hormones, such as Addison’s disease, can also cause a change in melanin production. If you take certain medications, then you may experience hyperpigmentation as a side effect. Freckles are also a form of hyperpigmentation. Injury to the skin is another reason for hyperpigmentation development.

Read: What is the Difference Between Freckles and Age Spots?

How Can You Treat Hyperpigmentation?

There are a few different steps to treating hyperpigmentation. If an illness such as Addison’s disease or some other specific condition such as pregnancy causes it, then you should discuss with your doctor ways to control the hormones or other factors that contribute to the increase of melanin. If you believe it is caused by medicine, then discuss trying another medication instead. Wearing sunscreen and minimizing sun exposure can prevent hyperpigmentation due to excessive exposure to UV rays.

Once you have the cause under control, you can treat the areas of dark skin with a skin lightening cream. However, you want to ensure you do not use creams with harmful or toxic ingredients, especially if you are pregnant or have a medical condition. Common lightening ingredients and bleaches, including kojic acid and hydroquinone, can cause more harm then good, even if they work. Therefore, you should focus on using natural ingredients that will not only lighten your skin, but also help your skin to heal and look its best.

Licorice root extract and vitamin C are two powerful ingredients that nourish the skin, helping it to heal itself, while also expediting the lightening of the dark spots. If you find that your problems do not improve even with treatment, then you can discuss more invasive treatments with your doctor. You do not have to live with your hyperpigmentation; you can get your skin back to looking its best.

Have a question about your scar or dark spots? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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What is the Difference Between Freckles and Age Spots

What is the Difference Between Freckles and Age Spots

Freckles and age spots both involve brown spots of skin, especially on the face. However, they are typically referred to, treated, and thought of differently. Age spots and freckles do have some similarities; however, they are two different types of hyperpigmentation that can be treated similarly.

What Makes the Skin Darken?

The skin darkens due to damage to the skin cells, especially the cells that produce melanin or pigment. Everyone has a regular pigment that his or her skin produces, whether fair or dark skin. When the skin cells DNA becomes damaged, either due to the sun, trauma or age, then the melanin production can be damaged. This can lead to hyperpigmentation, or dark spots.

What are Freckles?

Freckles typically are small and occur on those who have fair skin, especially red headed people. They typically occur on children and fade as a person ages, although a person with hereditary freckles can have them for his or her whole life. Sun exposure typically causes them; therefore, the more time someone spends in the sun, the more freckles he or she will get. The freckles may also become darker after spending time in the sun without broad sunscreen protection. Freckles tend to be an inherited trait, especially as they go hand in hand with other hereditary traits, including red hair and fair skin. For those where it is inherited, the appearance of freckles is inevitable, however consistent use of sunscreen can help to minimize just how many and how dark they will be.

What are Age Spots?

Age spots tend to be bigger than freckles and occur due to aging, as the name implies. They can also be slightly raised. Typically, age spots occur on the hands and face, rather than the entire body – unless you’ve experience a severe sunburn, on your back or shoulders, then dark spots can appear in these areas as well.

Although sun exposure plays a significant role in the development of age spots, they tend to occur due to deterioration of the skin cells that is part of the natural aging process. The more time a person has spent in the sun, the more damage to their cells, which is why age spots are connected to sun damage. The years of sun damage can lead to more melanin production in a certain area, causing an age spot. This is why wearing sun protective clothing, as well as broad spectrum sunscreen is vitally important from an early age.

The Difference Between Freckles and Age Spots

The main difference between freckles and age spots is the age of the person and the size and location of the spots. Freckles are small, can appear anywhere, and are directly attributed to sun exposure in those susceptible; they are also inherited. Freckles can appear on anyone of any age, especially children. Age spots, are not hereditary,  can occur to anyone of any skin type, tend to develop on the hands and face, can also be larger in size and begins to be noticed in middle age.

Treatment of Dark Spots and Freckles

Whether a dark spot due to sun damage or freckles from the same or genetics, there are only two ways to minimize their appearance. Prevention with the use of sunscreen year round and generously applied every two hours and using a dark spot treatment. Make sure the sunscreen you are using blocks both UVA and UVB rays and that the treatment for dark spots is one that is effective with skin lighteners such as Vitamin C and licorice root extract.

Do you have a question about your scar or dark spot? Leave a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

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