Do Scars Stretch During Pregnancy?

Do Scars Stretch During Pregnancy?

Pregnancy is a series of nourishment needs and hormonal changes. The body must accommodate the fetus and does so with the production of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), stronger blood stream circulations, and ever-expanding skin. It’s this point that often proves the most concerning, with tissue around the abdomen, thighs, hips, and waist consistently growing throughout each trimester. Women often wonder what the effect of this growth will be on their scars – and if it will last.

Read More: Skin Changes During Pregnancy

How Does Pregnancy Affect Scars?

Scars will stretch during pregnancy. Hormonal fluctuations and natural weight gain will cause skin to expand, and this will instantly alter the appearance of every abrasion, keloid, or contracture. Elongation is to be expected. It’s also often accompanied by:

Irritation

Redness, scaly textures, and mild irritation will often form around scars. This is due both to a lack of moisture in the skin and immune system deficiencies.

Hardening

Scars may harden during pregnancy, with the tissue not receiving the necessary levels of hydration needed to sustain softness.

Pain

The sudden expansion of scars can cause pain, with tightening sensations often felt along the stomach and hips. These sensations are not usually severe but can occur frequently.

New Scars

Pregnancy doesn’t merely elongate past scars. It can also create new ones. Stretch marks are among the most common symptoms associated with childbirth, with the elasticity of the skin pushed beyond its capacity and collagen production interrupted. This causes tiny tears, which then become scars.

As scars stretch to their maximum lengths during the final trimester these symptoms may become more obvious (and more frustrating). Women should consult with a physician if they experience consistent pain or find their everyday activities hindered.

Do Scars Remain Affected After Pregnancy?

Most scars will stretch during pregnancy. Those same scars should return to normal, though, after the child has been born. Resuming past levels of activity should tighten sagging skin, and a re-balance of hormone levels will deliver the necessary moisture (this will soften any rigid tissue and reduce swelling).

The healing process differs for every woman, however, and some may experience lingering effects – with scars remaining enlarged and tender for several weeks. If this proves problematic consult with a physician.

Read More: Scar Healing Time

Are Over-The-Counter Treatments Recommended for Scars After Pregnancy?

Over-The-Counter (OTC) treatments should be used with caution. Many utilize ineffective or even unsafe ingredients – such as Hydroquinone, a bleaching agent that has been banned throughout the European Union for its mercury-based properties – and can instead exacerbate the appearance of scars. However, InviCible Scars is safe to use during and after pregnancy. Before purchasing any product it is recommended that women consult with their dermatologists.

Read More: Do Over The Counter Scar Treatments Really Work?

Do you have more questions about pregnancy’s affect on your scars? Leave us a comment and we’ll be happy to answer.

Don’t forget to subscribe to Scars and Spots to have our posts delivered directly to your inbox.

Please follow and like us:
error

The information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. Please speak to your doctor to treat any medical condition. Information on this site is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-physician relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Comments

  1. The information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. Please speak to your doctor to treat any medical condition. Information on this site is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-physician relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.
  2. I am 35 weeks pregnant and have a big scar on my trunk due to an intramuscular lipoma 9 months ago. Its all red and bumpy and it looks like keloids.

    I sometimes get a sharp pain and constant pain due to the stretching and me getting bigger througout pregnancy.

    I’ve asked the midwifes and the consultant about this as I am worried that when I get to the pushing whilst in labour that will hurt even more as I have pain now.

    Anyone knows if there could be a complication because of my recent operation? They say its totally fine and it wont rupture or anything. I am just concerned.

Speak Your Mind

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.